Literacy Coordinating Council Convenes for the Workshop on the Development of the M&E System

Literacy Coordinating Council Convenes for the Workshop on the Development of the M&E System

The Literacy Coordinating Council (LCC), through its Secretariat organized the Workshop on the Development of the LCC’s M&E System at the National Educators Academy of the Philippines (NEAP) CALABARZON. LCC member representatives and select participants from various sectors such as DepEd, LGUs, and NGOs were enjoined to meet the following objectives: 1) to present the DepEd Basic Education Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (BEMEF) and discuss its significance in the development and management of LCC’s programs, projects, and activities; 2) to develop the M&E framework for the LCC anchored on BEMEF; and (3) to determine the data requirements, including the tools to be utilized for the LCC’s M&E System.

Under RA 10122, LCC is mandated to formulate measures for the Monitoring and Evaluation of the literacy situation in the country. Considering this mandate, LCC is also tasked to establish and maintain a data bank and information exchange system supportive of the literacy efforts at both national and local levels.  Thus, the LCC organized a platform where best practices could be shared and streamlined to forge a viable M&E System that would be instrumental in universalizing literacy in the Philippines. Certainly, Monitoring and Evaluation is a significant aspect of project management, therefore it serves as an enabling mechanism to determine the strengths and weaknesses, failure, and success of a program during and after the implementation process.

The Resource Persons who were invited to facilitate the workshop were Ms. Aurea Jean A. Abad and Ms. Miriam N. Coprado. On the other hand, Ms. Lia Angela Daus and Ms. Evelyn Ralor from DepEd Planning Service – Policy Research and Development Division gave a comprehensive presentation of Basic Education Monitoring and Evaluation Framework (BEMEF).  At the onset of the workshop proper, Ms. Abad led the participants in revisiting the LCC Blueprint for Action.  This is an action program for the attainment of the Philippines’ literacy goal: universalization of literacy in the country. It functions not only as a strategic framework in developing policies and implementing programs towards the eradication of illiteracy but also serves as a guide for other government agencies, local government units, and partners from the civil society who are considered concerned entities. Ms. Abad pointed out that the basic principles and general strategies of the LCC Blueprint for Action were adopted and suggested to various stakeholders and program partners in literacy work. The attainment of Sustainable Development Goal 4 which is to ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all according to the United Nations was also included in the said framework. In addition, three elements are necessary to make this work and these are the following: 1)  detailed objectives and implementation strategies; 2) the resources not only financial resources and budgetary appropriations but also the human resources, equipment, technology requirements, technical know-how and expertise;  and the 3)  timeline of the implementation. Shortly after the very informative discussion, Ms. Coprado gave an overview of the Project Management Cycle. She also tackled important points relative to the development of a Monitoring and Evaluation System or M&E System.

The second day of the workshop began with a management of learning activity facilitated by the LCC Secretariat.  It was a joyous experience that infused the energy of the participants before the comprehensive presentation of the introduction to Monitoring and Evaluation by Ms. Coprado. She thoroughly explained the definitions, objectives, and relationship between the Logic Model and Monitoring and Evaluation. She also pointed out that monitoring and evaluation are two separate parts of Project Management, yet these are interrelated strategies to collect data and report the findings on how well the program is performing.

As the main agenda of the workshop, the right steps to undertake to develop a viable M&E System are as follows:

Step 1. Conducting a readiness assessment

Step 2. Choosing outcomes to M&E

Step 3. Selecting key indicators to monitor outcomes

Step 4. Establishing baseline on indicators

Step 5. Selecting results targets

Step 6. Monitoring for results

Step 7. The role of evaluation

Step 8. Reporting and using the findings

Step 9. Sustaining the M&E system within the organization

Ms. Daus and Ms. Relor discussed the BEMEF which was formulated and adopted as DepEd’s guiding document for its operating units across governance levels in the conduct of monitoring and evaluation. The said framework prescribes rules and standards that are supportive of the global and national commitments of DepEd. It also sets the guidelines for the effective and efficient implementation of its programs specifically in delivering basic education in the country which are also aligned in its development plan.

The final leg of the 3-day workshop was spearheaded by Ms. Josephine Babaran from the Philippine Information Agency (PIA) who facilitated the enumeration game.

Then, Ms. Czarina D. Abellonar, Project Development Officer III of the LCC Secretariat, facilitated the workshop for the formulation of the LCC M&E System. She divided the participants into two groups and assigned two pillars of development as part of the Roadmap of the LCC. Group 1 worked on Ilaw (Advocacy, Social Mobilization and Partnerships) and Aruga (Learning and Organizational Development), while Group 2 tackled Yaman (Knowledge Management) and Buklod (Localization of LCC).

Following the presentations, Mr. Enrico R. Mendoza, Head of the LCC Secretariat, provided his insights about the participants’ inputs such as the adoption of best practices in at least 3 years, maintenance of the National Literacy Information System (NLIS) including the utilization rate of the page and content; reconstitution of the Local Literacy Coordinating Council (LLCC) membership due to change of leadership; assessment of the functionality of the LLCC and investment of LGUs to determine the functionality of the LLCC; lobbying for policy development regarding the establishment of LCC as a mandated body and gather policy recommendations and consider literacy development as part of the education development in the Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG) awards. Moreover, he recommended more engaging advocacy materials and encouraged the Philippine Information Agency to disseminate information through radio initiatives and the like.

In conclusion, Mr. Carlo Niño R. Claro, Education Technological Program Specialist from World Vision, a development partner of the LCC in its quest for eradication of illiteracy and universalization of literacy, shared his impressions about the workshop. He reiterated the importance of a robust M&E system: a strong Monitoring and Evaluation System that is crucial for tracking the program’s progress. He asserted that it is significant in identifying areas of improvement and ensuring the effectiveness of the Philippine literacy programs. He also stressed that collaboration among the council members, government agencies, NGOs, and local stakeholders is a key element to forge a more comprehensive approach to literacy development. Lastly, he highlighted the value of the impact of the program more than the outputs which pertains to the satisfaction rate, efficiency, and effectivity of programs that lead to holistic transformational development of the community and the lives of the family and children beneficiaries.

Day 3 (10)

Indeed, the dedication of LCC to develop a comprehensive M&E system is a vital significant step forward. Mr. Mendoza immensely thanked all the participants for their valuable contributions in his closing remarks. “M&E is not an enemy… Rather, it is a friendly tool that may be used in tracking development and performance results… I urge everyone to keep the flames of commitment burning as we passionately advocate for literacy nationwide,” he said. The workshop came to an end but has definitely marked a sense of optimism and a renewed sense of purpose to all the participants who are now equipped to build a better future for our countrymen.

Mr. Enrico R. Mendoza, LCC Secretariat, delivers his closing remarks.

Contributed by: 

Rossan C. Ignacio

Technical Assistant II

LCC Strengthens Data Management for Improved Literacy Development

 

GENERAL SANTOS CITY, Philippines – On September 5 to 8, 2023 the LCC conducted the Workshop on the Maintenance and Enhancement of the LCC Database System (Phase 1) at the National Educators Academy of the Philippines (NEAP) Region XII in General Santos City. The event brought together key stakeholders to bolster data management strategies aimed at advancing literacy development efforts nationwide. Participated by the representatives from the different Council member agencies, the LCC Secretariat, and resource persons, this activity aimed to review and enhance the structure, design, and content of the National Literacy Information System that is used to collect, store, and analyze critical data related to literacy.

During the opening program, LCC Secretariat head, Mr. Enrico R. Mendoza, highlighted the significance of data-driven decision-making in advancing literacy development in the Philippines. He stressed the importance of accurate and up-to-date information in formulating policies and strategies that address the evolving needs of learners and literacy program managers.

The workshop’s success signifies the LCC’s continued efforts to modernize its data infrastructure and align its strategies with current best practices in data management. By enhancing the National Literacy Information System, the LCC, its stakeholders, and partners are better equipped to monitor and evaluate literacy programs, allocate resources effectively, and drive positive change in the education landscape of the Philippines.

Phase 2 of the workshop is scheduled for conduct on September 25 to 28, 2023 in Cebu City.

 

The National Literacy Information System and its Role in Literacy Development

Availability of relevant data and information plays a very important role in various aspects of literacy development in the Philippines, and the Literacy Coordinating Council (LCC) has a significant role in overseeing and facilitating efforts on this, through the development and maintenance of the National Literacy Information System (NLIS).

Business and educational programs like the Literacy Coordinating Council’s work open up a wide range of opportunities. Likewise, online casinos offer a variety of games that open up a world of entertainment and gambling opportunities. Players can choose between most volatile slots, roulette or poker, each with its own unique gravity, similar to the variety of information systems and programs that help develop literacy in the Philippines.

Below are the elements that detail the significance of the NLIS in literacy development in the Philippines:

Data Collection and Analysis. Databases are essential for collecting and storing data related to literacy rates, educational resources, and the population’s educational needs. The NLIS helps LCC’s stakeholders in organizing and analyzing this data, enabling policymakers and educators to make informed decisions. This data can include literacy rates, demographic information, school infrastructure, and the availability of teaching materials.

Resource Allocation. A complete and updated data collection system on literacy can help the government allocate resources effectively at the national and local levels. By having accurate data on literacy levels and educational needs, national government agencies and local government executives can allocate funds, teachers, and educational materials to areas where they are most needed. This ensures that resources are distributed equitably and efficiently, ultimately benefiting literacy development.

Monitoring and Evaluation. Databases and management information systems allow for the continuous monitoring and evaluation of literacy programs and initiatives. This helps identify what’s working and what needs improvement. Regular assessments can lead to adjustments in educational policies and strategies, leading to better literacy outcomes.

Targeted Interventions. With data-driven insights, the government and NGOs can design and implement targeted interventions to address specific literacy challenges. For example, if data shows that a particular region has a low literacy rate, targeted programs can be introduced to address the root causes, whether it’s lack of access to schools or specific language barriers.

Accountability and Transparency. Databases and management information systems contribute to accountability and transparency in literacy development efforts. Stakeholders can track the progress of programs and hold responsible parties accountable for their results, which can help ensure that resources are used effectively and corruption is minimized.

Policy Formulation. Accurate and up-to-date data is essential for formulating effective literacy policies. The government can use this information to set targets, create strategies, and enact legislation that promotes literacy development.

The Literacy Coordinating Council plays a vital role in the context of literacy development. It coordinates various government agencies, nongovernment organizations, and other stakeholders involved in literacy initiatives. It ensures that efforts are synchronized and complementary, avoiding duplication and fragmentation. It also participates in the formulation of policies related to literacy and basic education and it also provides recommendations and insights based on data and best practices to help shape effective policies. Moreover, the Council serves as an advocate for literacy development at both the national and local levels. It raises awareness about the importance of literacy and mobilizes support from government and civil society. The LCC may have a role in advising on the allocation of resources for literacy programs and initiatives. It ensures that funds are directed to where they are most needed and can have the greatest impact. It is responsible for monitoring and evaluating literacy programs and initiatives to assess their effectiveness and provide recommendations for improvement.

The NLIS is a critical tool for informed decision-making in literacy development, and the Literacy Coordinating Council plays a pivotal role in coordinating, advocating for, and overseeing efforts to improve literacy in the Philippines. Together, these elements contribute to more effective and efficient literacy development programs and policies.

To access the NLIS, please visit the LCC website.

National Literacy Information System (NLIS) Database

The NLIS database can be accessed through

https://lcc.deped.gov.ph/nlis

National Literacy Information System (NLIS) Article

https://bit.ly/3BEWiTe

The Literacy Coordinating Council is resolute in its mandate and commitment to achieving a universalized literacy in the Philippines. As part of the resolution’s mandatory provision, it is encouraged that the Literacy Coordinating Council through its Council Member Representatives, literacy stakeholders, as well as the concerned public to advocate and promote the utilization of the NLIS database and contribute as well to the provision of pertinent literacy data and information needed for its enhancement.

Through this digital literacy initiative, partnerships, and linkages between and among different literacy stakeholders can also be strengthened, which will result in improved literacy program interventions not only at the national but also down to the grassroots level.

For easy reference, digital copies of the LCC Resolution No. 2, s. 2021 & Infographics of the NLIS may be accessed and downloaded via.

LCC Resolution No. 2, s. 2021

https://lcc.deped.gov.ph/NLIS_Resolution_2

NLIS Infographics

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1eGTUzida3JfAYzdCypVBui7dGhvXfzHD/view

Terence Joshua S. Canlas

The Literacy Coordinating Council Launches the National Literacy Information System (NLIS)

The National Literacy Information System interface lodged at the LCC Website

The Literacy Coordinating Council (LCC) during its 147th Council meeting held on September 20, 2021, via Microsoft Teams officially launched the NLIS through the issuance of LCC Resolution No. 02, s. 2021, entitled “ADOPTION OF THE NATIONAL LITERACY INFORMATION SYSTEM DATABASE, INCLUDING ITS UTILIZATION, PUBLICATION, AND MAINTENANCE IN THE OFFICIAL LITERACY COORDINATING COUNCIL WEBSITE.” Department of Education (DepEd) Undersecretary and LCC chairperson Diosdado M. San Antonio presided over the approval of the resolution as part of the agenda of the LCC Meeting.

The said Resolution provides for the adoption of the National Literacy Information System (NLIS) database as the official and primary database management system administered by the Literacy Coordinating Council to support its literacy endeavors, as well as synchronize and strengthen policies and efforts toward the universalization of literacy in the country. This issuance also serves as a formal document and basis for the System’s promotion and dissemination to local government units (LGU), non-government organizations (NGO), as well as other concerned literacy stakeholders and partners.

One of LCC’s strategies in advocating a universalized literacy in the country is the utilization of digital platforms, through a continuous process of development and enhancement of a national inter-agency database that will not only address the gaps of service delivery, especially the literacy efforts and implementation of literacy programs and projects at the grassroots level but also disseminate a nationwide campaign for digital literacy, which will also complement efforts to provide opportunities for lifelong learning and 21st-century skills development among all Filipinos.

Formulating measures on the monitoring and evaluation of the literacy situation in the country, including the establishment and maintenance of a national data bank and information exchange and dissemination system to support literacy efforts at the national and local levels is one of the functions of the Council as provided for under RA 7165, as amended by RA 10122 and its Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR).

This is being accomplished through the development and maintenance of LCC’s National Literacy Information System. Pertinent data on literacy are gathered and organized through different NLIS modules, namely:  Literacy Laws and Policies, Research on Literacy, Literacy Survey, Basic Education, National Literacy Conference, National Literacy Awards, Community-Based Literacy Programs, Literacy Partners, Best Practices in Literacy, Resources, and LCC Secretariat. This database serves as a digital resource platform especially developed to provide data and information which may be used by concerned national government agencies, LGUs, NGOs, and other relevant stakeholders in policy formulation and literacy program development and management.

The NLIS is a result of the collective efforts, commitment, and contribution of the Council representatives, TWG members, and the LCC Secretariat in the development of the database management system through various phases of conceptualization, system development, data population and update, system enhancement, user testing, and system validation. Ongoing initiatives are being done for the System’s maintenance continuous improvement.

The Literacy Coordinating Council is resolute in its mandate and commitment to achieving a universalized literacy in the Philippines. As part of the resolution’s mandatory provision, it is encouraged that the Literacy Coordinating Council through its Council Member Representatives, literacy stakeholders, as well as the concerned public to advocate and promote the utilization of the NLIS database and contribute as well to the provision of pertinent literacy data and information needed for its enhancement.

Through this digital literacy initiative, partnerships and linkages between and among different literacy stakeholders can also be strengthened, which will result in improved literacy program interventions not only at the national but also down to the grassroots level.

This NLIS database can be accessed through the official LCC Website, or at https://lcc.deped.gov.ph/nlis.

For a copy of the LCC Resolution No. 2, s. 2021 please visit: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rwiWTVH7E6RUPHVL6tK_xW6fZsZNP_Yl/view

Photo Opportunity during the 147th Council Meeting
Audio-Visual Presentation (AVP) of the National Literacy Information System Database (NLIS)

Terence Joshua S. Canlas